PHOTO | COURTESYPHOTO | COURTESY
By MWENDE KASUJJA

Scrolling through the late June Wanza Mulupi’s online activities, one cannot help but notice her compassion and generosity.

June, who died after complications that arose from a botched breast enlargement surgery, had started a street children feeding program.

Her love for food that is evident in her blog mimibites where she would often share recipes which made her start the program to feed the homeless.

In her own words, her numerous trips to Nairobi’s CBD made her achieve some “sense of satisfaction” and that she felt “right and content.”

“Before I started my journey into the streets, I told my friends about it and l became the laughing stock. They doubted me, which made me think twice about what l was getting myself into but l felt this urge inside me telling me that this is what I’m supposed to do. I couldn’t live with myself if I didn’t even try to head to the streets and help someone’s life… I didn’t know how to go about it especially because of the insecurity aspect. I had no knowledge of anyone who had done what I was going to do. I felt like the Eve of Street Kindness,” June wrote on her blog.

PHOTO | COURTESY

PHOTO | COURTESY

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The 35-year-old mother of three detailed her first search for disabled homeless children that she could feed.

“On reaching the streets, I almost lost hope and went back home. The search for the disabled in the streets of Nairobi was hard work, a certain saying came to mind what you want you don’t get it and whoever gets it doesn’t want it. Me and my friend walked aimlessly around Nairobi into the most insecure of places but still no luck, I felt like giving up on the two hour walk which turned out to not be fruitful. I thought of my new born baby I had left at home who at the time was a month old. The thought, why did I leave her to come waste time lingered through my mind. But as soon as I was about to tell my friend from high school that it was time to go back, who by the way l accidentally bumped into and she told me that she worked for Undugu society. (Divine connection) We took a corner and there was my first victim, where my heart was leading me to and my mind was fighting to repel. I felt the joy inside me and my heart relaxed. Then l went and said hi to the family, we exchanged a few words and l offered them food. A sense of satisfaction filled me, l felt right and content. Then l could not stop myself from going,” June wrote.

June has on countless times appealed on Facebook cooking groups urging other Kenyans of goodwill to join her in the feeding program.