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How Nairobi has been transformed by the coronavirus outbreak – PHOTOS

Nairobi has always been the city that never sleeps but now it has been half asleep for the past 22 days.

This after the government enforced the countrywide dusk-to-dawn curfew, restricting movement and business from 7pm to 5am daily.

NEW NORM

The city is slowing adapting to the new norm of life due to the coronavirus pandemic affecting the whole wide world. Things are slow but life has to go on and the ever-crafty city dwellers are adapting and making it through day by day.

A spot check by Nairobi News around the city revealed that things are different on the ground. Businesses such as M-Pesa shops, phone shops, chemists, clothes boutique, shoe shiners, movie shops and other small businesses which keep the city running are still operating.

Residents of Nairobi going about their business around the Kenya National Archives open public space. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU
Residents of Nairobi going about their business around the Kenya National Archives open public space. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU

Even the ever persistent hawkers are still on the streets selling their wares despite the presence of the county inspectorate officers.

Restaurants and bars have been hit the most, with nearly all of them closed, leaving thousands jobless and in limbo.

Hawkers selling their wares near Khoja Mosque Bus stop. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU
Hawkers selling their wares near Khoja Mosque Bus stop. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU

NIGHT LIFE

The noisy city night life is now gone. Popular night clubs, such as Scratch and Nevada along Moi Avenue to Club Geo along Tom Mboya to Roast House near Khoja Stage, have all closed their doors, while most food joints are only open for take away orders.

Some restaurants, like Sizzling Grill, along Moi Avenue Ambassaduer stage, have been closed down until further notice.

A mask clad boda boda rider with his passenger along Tom Mboya Street. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU
A mask clad boda boda rider with his passenger along Tom Mboya Street. PHOTO | FRANCIS NDERITU

The streets have now been invaded by hawkers who are doing brisk business selling face masks.

And every day at dusk, Nairobi, which is home to 4 million people, becomes a ghost city; not a single soul in sight on the streets.

This is how much Nairobi has been transformed by the coronavirus outbreak.