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Research: Coffee reduces chances of contracting liver diseases

Did you know that having three to four cups of coffee in a day can save you from chronic liver diseases?

Well, now you know and have every reason to savor your regular cup of coffee.

Coffee drinkers have a 21 percent lower chance of developing liver ailments later in life compared to non-coffee drinkers, according to a new study conducted at the University of Southampton.

The research which was published in the journal of Bio-Med Central (BMC) Public Health on Tuesday, June 22, 2021, also indicates that regular coffee drinkers are less likely to die from chronic liver diseases by 49 percent than non-coffee drinkers.

Explaining the findings of the study, the scientists said coffee contains compounds named cafestol and kahweol which apparently moderate inflammation which can cause liver damage.

The essential compounds, which previous studies on animals have indicated have more health benefits in warding off chronic liver complications, were found to be higher in ground coffee such as espresso, compared to instant types of coffee.

The experts, however, concluded that a drink of any type of coffee, be it decaffeinated or instant, was directly linked to decreased chances of liver ailments.

According to the author of the study, Dr Oliver Kennedy, the findings of the study are a huge step towards developing preventive treatment against chronic diseases, considering coffee is readily available in most parts of the world.

“Meanwhile, caffeine is believed to combat harmful liver scarring. Coffee is widely accessible and the benefits we see may mean it could offer a potential preventative treatment,” said

To come up with their findings, the researchers engaged a sample of 494,585 individuals aged between 40 to 69 from the UK Biobank.

They studied coffee consumption and medical histories of the individuals whereby data indicated that three-quarters of the respondents were regular coffee drinkers, with an average of two cups a day.

After following up closely on the respondents for an average of 10 years, 301 individuals succumbed to chronic liver maladies while 3,600 developed liver problems.