NTV’s Dennis Okari with his ex-wife KTN's Betty Kyallo. PHOTO | COURTESYNTV’s Dennis Okari with his ex-wife KTN's Betty Kyallo. PHOTO | COURTESY
By EVELYNE MUSAMBI

NTV’s Dennis Okari is set to join the television station’s news anchoring team starting next week.

The investigative journalist told Nairobi News that he is looking forward to rekindling his old love of news anchoring.

During the interview, Okari  steered clear of his private life, only commenting about his daughter Ivanna.

PUBLICITY

“My daughter does not deserve the kind of publicity she has been getting, she deserves to grow up quietly and no one including myself as her father should interfere with her rights to privacy,” he said.

Asked about his love life since his dramatic divorce with KTN TV presenter Betty Kyallo he said; “I’ll speak when the right timecomes and I can assure you it’s going to be very soon.”

We sought to find Okari’s other side besides the investigative reporter we have known him him to be. He loves art, he says he can draw and paint.

“My love for art developed about 10 years ago. I have always been creative but afraid of expressing myself so when I created my first pieces and put them on my wall a friend appreciated the art and ever since I have been embracing art,” he said.

Okari is also a motivational speaker, a passion developed from way back when he was a youth leader.

‘BORN AGAIN’

“I got born again in high school. I missed my steps and was fighting the call of my God given assignment and that is why currently I have been getting stories from the Bible and relating them to the current life in the posts that you have been seeing on my page,” he said.

He says he is currently working on a book on his experiences where he plans to outline everything about his love life and professional life.

He hopes the book will be able to help people not to make the same mistakes he made in life.

The teetotaler loves adventure and attempts the most dangerous things be it on the line of duty or otherwise.

‘BOMB SQUAD’

“I remember there was this time in Somalia we were on our way to interview Jubaland President and the Amison bomb squad found an IED in the route we had used the previous evening. So when they took it to a safe place to detonate I asked if I could come close enough to hear the shock wave. of course they refused but allowed me a safe distance where I felt the shock wave but it was not strong enough to make me fall. I love new experiences and often it ends up being dangerous,” he said.

Okari brings to the new anchoring team his field experience which he says will enable him deliver the stories in the best way possible.