Members of the Nairobi Business Community address journalists at Uhuru Park on October23, 2017. PHOTO | EVANS HABILMembers of the Nairobi Business Community address journalists at Uhuru Park on October23, 2017. PHOTO | EVANS HABIL
By BRIAN MOSETI, @Mossetti [email protected]

A section of the so called Nairobi Business Community showed up for a press conference on Monday clad in military fatigue at the Uhuru Park.

The four members of the group appeared in complete American military fatigue including patrol cap, jackets, combat boots and dark shades.

They were part of the Nairobi Business Community who had gathered to petition the Inspector General of Police and the IEBC on the safety of elections.

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

They appealed on everyone to vote on October 26, but said they have no objection to opposition demonstrations in the city centre provided they are peaceful.

“We are protecting our businesses and the future of our businesses. If the opposition people want to demonstrate, we don’t have any problem. We will only have issue if they destroy our businesses,” warned Mr Wilfred Kamau, the leader of the Nairobi Business Community.

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

The display of military fatigued by the group comes days after top Jubilee women leadership wore similar attire that included red berets during campaigns for President Uhuru Kenyatta.

The National Police Act criminalizes the use of disciplined forces’ uniforms by civilians.

Section 101 of National Police Service Act states: “Impersonation of police officer or wearing police uniform, etc. (1) A person other than a police officer who, without the written authority of the Inspector-General— (a) puts on or assumes, either in whole or in part, the uniform, name, designation or description of a police officer, or a uniform, name or designation, resembling or intended to resemble the uniform, name or designation of a police officer.”

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

Offenders are “liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding one million shillings or to a term of imprisonment not exceeding ten years, or to both.”

Section 279 of the KDF Act provides for “imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year” for offenders.